In our spread offense, offensive linemen are expected to be able to reach, drive, pull and trap block. We work on these types of blocks daily with the following drills. Reach block In a reach block, the linemen must be able to work their body across a defender who is lined up to the right or left of them and then turn and/or drive them. In this drill, all linemen are given a specific play to block. At the beginning of the season, when the players are only allowed to wear helmets, stand-up dummies can be used to simulate

https://blogs.usafootball.com/blog/1277/4-blocking-drills-to-apply-technique-on-the-offensive-line

In our spread offense, offensive linemen are expected to be able to reach, drive, pull and trap block.

We work on these types of blocks daily with the following drills.

Reach block

In a reach block, the linemen must be able to work their body across a defender who is lined up to the right or left of them and then turn and/or drive them. In this drill, all linemen are given a specific play to block.

At the beginning of the season, when the players are only allowed to wear helmets, stand-up dummies can be used to simulate the front of a 40 or 50 defense.

During this phase, it’s important to eliminate any excessive steps.

When the players are allowed to fully equip and have contact, the boxes of various defenses can be utilized during the drill.

When evaluating look for the following: stance, linemen splits, quickness, footwork and the ability to execute assignments.

Trap block

For any offense to reach its full potential, guards must be able to trap block. This drill involves the following:

Teaching the steps of the pull: If the guard pulls right, his first step is a hard step with the right foot back and to the right. If he pulls, left it’s the opposite.

The drill begins with a snap by the center. The guard pulls to the side called and blocks by placing his hands on the upfield side of the defender, driving the defender both out and back.

When evaluating, look for the following: stance, splits, footwork, speed, intensity, execution and duration.

Drive block

In any offense, the ability to drive an opponent back is paramount. This drill can be done with a single man, two-man or five-man sleds.

The linemen fire off on the snap and gain control of their opponents, taking six- to eight-inch power steps while maintaining a low body technique with the chest over the thighs and keeping the back flat. During the block, linemen keep their hands inside the torso of their opponent.

When evaluating, look for the following: splits, footwork, body angle (Was the chest over the thighs? Was the back flat?), hand placement, speed, intensity and duration.

Pull

In a pull block, linemen must be able to get off the ball quickly, get in front of the ball-carrier and either kick out or drive block an opponent.

Teaching the steps of the pull: If the guard pulls right, his first step is a hard step with the right foot back and to the right. If he pulls, left it’s the opposite.

On the snap, the pulling guard pulls to the side called and reads the defense. This will tell him whether he is to kick out a defender or turn upfield and lead for the ball-carrier.

When evaluating look for the following: stance, splits, footwork, speed, intensity, execution and duration.

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