Football coaches preach the importance of winning the turnover battle, because it is one of the few statistics that directly correlates to a season’s win/loss record. As Hall of Fame Coach Jimmie Johnson said: “Like I always say, it's not how many great plays you make. It's how few bad ones you make. I know fans, and even some losing coaches, are enamored with long pass completions or the great run plays, but that doesn't offset the interception or the fumble.” Essentially, Johnson is saying that training to eliminate offensive turnovers can be as important

https://web.usafootball.com/blogs/receivers/post/12564/skills-and-drills:-miami-dolphins-ball-security-drill

Football coaches preach the importance of winning the turnover battle, because it is one of the few statistics that directly correlates to a season’s win/loss record.
As Hall of Fame Coach Jimmie Johnson said: “Like I always say, it’s not how many great plays you make. It’s how few bad ones you make. I know fans, and even some losing coaches, are enamored with long pass completions or the great run plays, but that doesn’t offset the interception or the fumble.”
Essentially, Johnson is saying that training to eliminate offensive turnovers can be as important as implementing and practicing the offensive game plan.
Statistics corroborate Johnson’s beliefs. Teams that posted a positive turnover ratio in the NFL from 2008-13 combined for a .790 winning percentage. A closer look at last season’s NFL statistics reveals a similar correlation, seven of the top 10 teams in the NFL turnover margin statistic made the playoffs.
There are numerous drills that coaches can utilize to help their teams win the turnover battle, including the one below by the Miami Dolphins.
The first station places an offensive player between two defensive players. The offensive player carries two balls, which are secured respectively within each hand. On the coach’s whistle, the two defenders attempt to strip the balls loose. Be sure to limit the amount of time for each strip to about two to three seconds, otherwise a wrestling match usually ensues and slows down the drill.
Once this station is complete, the coach blows a whistle and the ball-carrier proceeds to the next station, running full speed over incrementally placed agility bags. Coaches positioned on either side of the agility bags take a single swat at the ball with a blocking pad or shield, serving as distractions as the ball-carrier practices proper footwork.
The final station utilizes an individual coach and a single cone placed directly in the ball-carrier’s path. When the ball-carrier clears the agility bags, the coach triggers to which side of the cone the ball-carrier runs, all the time using proper footwork by planting and cutting to the open side of the cone.
This drill reinforces the importance of ball security while working on proper footwork and is appropriate for all ages. Run effectively, coaches can keep this drill moving by having a different ball-carrier working through each respective station.

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